LGBTIQ legal workshops for Mtns

June 20, 2016 in Broader Community Event, Event, News, womens event by Peter Hackney

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How is discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, intersex or queer (LGBTIQ) people defined from a legal point of view?

What action can someone take if they’ve been vilified because of their sexual orientation or gender identity?

How can people transitioning to a different gender change their identity documents?

What support services and community referrals for LGBTIQ people are available in the Blue Mountains?

The answers to these questions and many more will be provided at two upcoming workshops in Katoomba.

An initiative of Elizabeth Evatt Community Legal Centre in conjunction with Pink Mountains, the Katoomba Neighbourhood Centre and the Inner City Legal Centre, both events include lunch for participants and will be held at the Katoomba Neighbourhood Centre, 6-10 Station Street, Katoomba – but each will have a different focus and target audience.

Julie Howes from the Elizabeth Evatt Community Legal Centre (EECLC), Korey Gunnis from the Katoomba Neighbourhood Centre (KNC), Laurie Strathdee (KNC), Tina Napier (EECLC), and Peter Hackney from Pink Mountains.

Julie Howes from the Elizabeth Evatt Community Legal Centre (EECLC), Korey Gunnis from the Katoomba Neighbourhood Centre (KNC), Laurie Strathdee (KNC), Tina Napier (EECLC), and Peter Hackney from Pink Mountains.

The first workshop will be held on Friday, June 24 from 12.30pm to 4pm and is designed for community sector workers, health care workers, educators, domestic violence support workers and government agency staff who provide support and services to LGBTIQ people.

The second workshop will be held on Saturday, June 25 from 11am to 1pm, and will be for LGBTIQ members of the public and their families.

Julie Howes, a solicitor from the Elizabeth Evatt Community Legal Centre, said the workshops were borne out of community experiences.

“Local instances of homophobia and transphobia have been brought to our attention, and one of the things that stood out for us is that some LGBTIQ people aren’t aware of their legal options or where they can turn if they experience discrimination,” said Ms Howes.

“It’s also clear there are gaps locally in terms of community support services for LGBTIQ people. We hope to provide community support workers with a sound understanding of the legal rights of LGBTIQ people, and help establish local referral networks.”

For more information on the workshops or to book your place, email bookings@eeclc.org.au or phone Julie or Tina on (02) 4782 4155.